Studio Makeover: Part 1

I had completely cleaned up my studio at the beginning of the year and though there were plastic tubs of fabric in another room and boxes of supplies that lined one wall because I didn’t have anywhere else to put them, I was feeling pretty good about things. Then in the first four months of the year I had to prepare booth samples for two shows in January, design and create multiple projects (with step-outs) for two TV tapings in February and March and finally prepare for three more shows in April. Oh, and there was a trip to the Philippines thrown in the middle of all that. The end result was a complete disaster in my studio!

Studio - Before photo #1

Studio - Before photo #1

I’m totally embarrassed to show how bad things got, but I have a strange feeling that I may not be alone. So in the spirit of sharing the process that I went through to create a usable studio space, here is the disaster in all its glory.

I had no idea where to begin. The biggest problem was that I simply didn’t have enough storage space. The only “official” storage I had were a wall of plastic drawers. I had lots of other “storage” in boxes and plastic bins, but I didn’t even know what was inside of those any more.

I should mention that I have quite a few supplies! Because I am always dreaming up new ways to use Kaleidoscope Kreator, I have supplies for quilting, scrapbooking/card making/paper crafting, rubber stamping, painting/stenciling, beading/jewelry and polymer clay – plus lots and lots of embellishments (aka “found objects”). Even worse, my fabric stash wasn’t even in the studio area. I had sorted it into plastic bins, but those bins were now being used as “tables” in my office with piles of paper on top, making it difficult to even get to the fabric!

Studio - Before photo #2

Studio - Before photo #2

Unfortunately, it would not simply be a matter of putting up shelves or cabinets because the room that I call my studio didn’t have any flat wall space. You’re probably thinking, “How can a wall not be flat?” Problem #1 was that there were ledges half way up the walls. Problem #2 was that the one wall that made sense to put cabinets on also had “cut outs” that looked like filled-in window wells. Problem #3 was the barn wood “paneling” on the lower half. I hated it! The barn wood was one big spider magnet and snagged anything that got near it. It definitely had to go!

This was clearly not going to be a quick and easy overhaul of my studio and I could be without it for quite a while. But I could no longer work in my studio in the condition it was in, so I began the long process of defining and designing exactly how I wanted my studio to function and to look.

Next up: Designing a Functional Space

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